Negotiating multi-modal movement: finding common values

To focus on commuters, we can look at a set of values that might make up part of a person’s belief system:

  • “I want to get there as fast as possible”
  • “I want to get there as conveniently as possible”
  • “Don’t get in my way”
  • “Mind yourself”
  • “Don’t endanger me”
  • “I’ll walk if I need to”
  • “It’s better to commute actively than regret not going to the gym”
  • “I can dress for any weather”
  • “I can use my body’s energy to help get me there”
  • “I don’t want the cost of a vehicle”
  • “I don’t want to get stuck in traffic”
  • “I want my freedom”

What different selection of beliefs might apply if we generalised a typical driver, or person who goes by bike, or bus, or e-device-thingy, or walks?

I speculate that drivers share these same values as the others:

  • “I want to get there as fast as possible”
  • “I want to get there as conveniently as possible”
  • “Don’t endanger me”
  • “I want my freedom”
  • “I don’t want to get stuck in traffic”

Rather than trying to convince habitual car drivers that their values are incorrect, we can instead look for shared values.

That makes it possible to move from the “master/slave” relationship that private car traffic has with others in our public space, to a place of negotiation.

“If we all accept these values as valid beliefs, then how can we accommodate that for you and me?”.

Reference: Jordan Peterson, lecture 01 “Maps of Meaning 2016” on YouTube.